Pay To Give a Presentation

Normally, people are paid to give presentations  –  not the other way around, especially at conferences.

An email from ubm-info.com which belongs to UBM who are organising the Technology for Marketing conference for September 2017 in London.

The email is about a  Call for Papers – they want people to present papers in areas to do with use of technology in Marketing.

They want

  • Case studies on multi channel approaches
  • The competitive edge of personalisation
  • Leadership in the modern age
  • How content can transform the brand story

And so on.

This all sounds reasonable.

The bottom of the email states “Please note that submissions from suppliers may be liable to a fee if entry is successful”

It sounds mean to charge people for giving a presentation but maybe it’s just a catchall statement and they reserve the right to charge if a supplier is basically giving a sales pitch rather than just a presentation.

That’s the world of Marketing.

Do you have an opinion on this matter? Please comment in the box below.

 

Hoax-Slayer

The website is www.hoax-slayer.net

Hoax-Slayer is owned and operated by Brett Christensen, who lives in Queensland.

Hoax-Slayer debunks email and social media hoaxes, thwarts Internet scammers, combats spam, and educates web users about email, social media, and Internet security issues. That’s how it describes itself.

Hoax-Slayer also highlights latest scams, has a series of guides to avoid the most popular types of scam. It’s been in operation since 2003 and is paid for by advertising (the adverts are quite intrusive at times) and affiliate commission on product sales.

This site also looks at hoaxes of various kinds – some involving scams and some not.

E.g. “Donald Trump Arrested Virus” Fake-News Post

Message circulating via WhatsApp and social media websites warns users not to read a news item showing “two police officers arresting Donald Trump on your computer screen” because it is a virus that will infect your computer.

E.g. 2  Decorative Magnets on Refrigerators – Cancer Warning Hoax

Warning message claims that researchers at Princeton University have discovered that electromagnetic radiation from decorative magnets stuck to refrigerator doors “radiated” the food inside thereby massively increasing the probability of cancer in test mice used in the study. The hoax goes into detail about research at Princeton to prove this.

This is just rubbish of course.

There are moving images on screen which can be annoying but the site content is very good and in a modern format so the site works well on mobile devices.

You can subscribe to receive an email of headlines each time there is a new post or you can use the RSS feed if you prefer to manage the data directly.

The site is based in Australia but the world of scammers knows no international boundaries and the same scams are found the world over.

Do click on the Facebook or Twitter icons on top right to follow Fight Back Ninja.

Ivana and The Gumtree Paypal Scam

Ivana and her husband had a car to sell.

Why not try Gumtree?  After all, Gumtree is British and it works for local people and especially for large items that the buyer collects.

In the case of a car – no point advertising for more than a short distance from home and it definitely needs to be collected. You can’t put a car in the post box.

The car went on sale but attracted little attention.

Then this arrived

“Great! please consider it sold and remove the adverts online as i am willing to pay your asking price? because i need to buy it for my cousin asap as a surprise gift, i have read through the advert and i’m totally satisfied with it,sadly i would not be able to come personally to collect due to my hearing loss and I’m just recovering from heart surgery so I’m home-bound. can i earn your trust, hope i wont be disappointed? I have a courier agent that would help me to pick it up at your preferred location after you have received your money and cleared to your account and i’ll pay you via PayPal today once you get back to me with your paypal email and full name. Where is the pick up location so that i can inform the courier agent about it now? Await your response”.

Ivana recognised this is a well-known scam.

  1. The buyer contacts you via email rather than a call
  2. The buyer offers to buy the item immediately, at full price, doesn’t ask any questions and is extremely keen.
  3. The buyer cannot visit to view the item and has a sob story to explain this.
  4. The buyer wants to send a courier ASAP to collect the item
  5. The buyer tries to circumvent paying by Gumtree by offering another method (this means that if you are scammed, Gumtree cannot help)

Quite often these scammers say they will pay by Paypal and you might wonder how someone can scam you if they’ve sent you money on Paypal.

The most common ways are

  1. They don’t pay but instead send fake emails that look like Paypal emails telling you that the money has been paid. Always check your Paypal account rather than accepting an email as proof and never click on links to access your Paypal account.
  2. They pay using a stolen Paypal account. When Paypal find out its stolen – you don’t get to keep the money.

With Gumtree, cash payment on collection may be the safest approach.

If you have any experiences with scammers, spammers or time-waster do let me know, by email.

How to Make Your Website Trusted

The first steps in having your website trusted are the obvious ones – make sure there is nothing that would concern people e.g. selling items of dubious or inconsistent quality, excessive advertising, advertising of business such as gambling, over promising on products or services then being unable to meet those promises, poor customer service, excessive profit margins, inaccurate advertising, poor quality website etc.

Once you have eliminated anything that could put people off then you’re left with two basic things – building a good reputation and hoping for great online reviews by your customers.

These both need a lot of time and effort to happen. Good reputations don’t happen overnight and people will only add great reviews when your sales process, quality of products and services, customer service etc. are top notch.

There is another way to increase trust and that is to become accredited by the various relevant bodies for whatever industry you are in and also to be accredited or registered with the various bodies that review websites.

Recent research shows that most customers don’t understand security on the Internet but they do trust various organisations and hence trust their judgements on trustworthy websites.

To the question “Which badge gives you the best sense of trust when paying online” the results show

  • Norton 36%
  • MacAfee 23%
  • Truste
  • BBB

Other badges did also register but these four were the most recognised and trusted by far.

What do you have to do to get Norton accreditation for example?

You buy a Symantec SSL certificate and implement that on your website.

The other companies listed above are Trust based rather than simply SSL recognition.

As well as the trusted badges, in assessing a website, consumers report that they look for qualities including

  • up to date information
  • fresh content
  • easy ways to contact the business
  • honesty about any problems
  • negative comments as well as positive ones
  • where appropriate – pictures of the management.

Make your website trusted for genuine reasons – don’t shortcut.

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